10 Lessons from the book Positioning By Al Ries and Jack Trout

Credits: Unsplash

The easy way to get into a person’s mind is to be first.

Credits: Unsplash

The most difficult part of positioning is selecting that one specific concept to hang your hat on. Yet you must, if you want to cut through the prospect's wall of indifference.

Credits: Unsplash

To find a unique position, you must ignore conventional logic.

Credits: Unsplash

In our overcommunicated society, the paradox is that nothing is more important than communication.

Credits: Unsplash

Don’t try to trick the prospect. Advertising is not a debate. It’s a seduction.

Credits: Unsplash

successful positioning requires consistency. You must keep at it year after year.

Credits: Unsplash

You build brand loyalty in a supermarket the same way you build mate loyalty in a marriage. You get there first and then be careful not give them a reason to switch.

Credits: Unsplash

successful positioning requires consistency. You must keep at it year after year.

Credits: Unsplash

Marriage, as a human institution, depends on the concept of first being better than best. And so does business.

Credits: Unsplash

What’s called luck is usually an outgrowth of successful communication.

Credits: Unsplash

affiliate link

Credits: Unsplash

Credits: Unsplash