10 Lessons from the book The Adweek Copywriting By Joseph Sugarman

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Think about how you are different than your competition.

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Make sure the problem you start with is a problem that your company can actually solve.

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Each problem has hidden in it an opportunity so powerful that it literally dwarfs the problem. The greatest success stories were created by people who recognized a problem & turned it into an opportunity.

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If I had to pick the single most powerful force in advertising and selling—the most important psychological trigger—I would pick honesty.

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The more tools you have to work on a problem in the form of experiences or knowledge, the more new ways you can figure out how to solve it.

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A person, product, or brand that can help us survive or thrive activates a survival mechanism within us that piques our curiosity.

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Make sure the first statement is a clear problem and make sure it is a pain people actually feel.

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Name only one problem and make it the one the most people feel.

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