10 Lessons from the book The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat

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If a man has lost a leg or an eye, he knows he has lost a leg or an eye; but if he has lost a self—himself—he cannot know it, because he is no longer there to know it.

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Dangerously well’— what an irony is this: it expresses precisely the doubleness, the paradox, of feeling ‘too well

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at some point in our lives, we have to let go of the fantasy of creating a better past.

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Losing somebody you love is such a profoundly lonely experience, something only you endure in your own particular way.

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Honesty is stronger medicine than sympathy, which may console but often conceals. —Gretel Ehrlich

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Nothing is more desirable than to be released from an affliction, but nothing is more frightening than to be divested of a crutch.—James Baldwin

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The things we protest against the most are often the very things we need to look at.

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We are mirrors reflecting mirrors reflecting mirrors, showing one another what we can’t yet see.

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